Tag: Military Hero

May We Never Forget Our Veterans

Veterans DayAt exactly 11:11 a.m. every Veteran’s Day (Nov. 11), the sun aligns perfectly with the Anthem Veteran’s Memorial in Arizona to shine through the ellipses of the five marble pillars representing each branch of the Armed Forces, illuminating The Great Seal of the United States.

According to the Veterans Administration, WWI – known at the time as “The Great War” – officially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hostilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of “the war to end all wars.”

In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the following words: “To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…”

So today, November 11, 2015 – let us reflect, with pride and gratitude, those who gave the ultimate sacrifice so we can enjoy the freedoms we do today.

Celebrating Real World Heroes – Pt 4

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In past celebrations of real world heroes, we’ve had some beautiful love stories and also spoke of the family sacrifice necessary for those who love the men and women who serve. Today, we are privileged to have both of those elements in our story.

Private 1st class, James Lee Phillips, turned 18 in July, 1944 and was drafted the following month. After completing 17 weeks of training, he was then allowed to go home for 7 days. With only one week to see his family and loved ones, he then said goodbye as he headed to Europe via the ship Queen Elizabeth where he became a truck driver for the Army.  He served overseas for 18 months.

During his time away, his family – knowing how much he must be missing home – would send him packages with deli meat/sausages.  When he finally returned home, he met a woman who he fell madly in love with. They had their first date on Valentine’s Day.  He took her home to meet his parents who were delighted to discover that she worked at the same deli his mother shopped at to send him the sausage. The family fell in love with her just as Private Phillips had and they were wed St. Patrick’s Day the same year they met (If you aren’t sure of the math…that’s 31 days later!!). The marriage has withstood the test of time and they are still married today, 63 years later.

As is the case in many families, the desire to serve runs from generation to generation. This year, James’ grandson, who served in the ROTC through college and received the ranking of 2nd Lieutenant was commissioned into the US Army National Guard. As part of the ceremony, he gave his first salute to his Grandfather, James Lee Phillips, World War II Veteran. His mother attests to the fact there wasn’t a dry eye in the place! They received a standing ovation.

 

Dan and his grampa

We thank this week’s real world hero, Private Phillips, for serving during World War II and for instilling the same call to duty and desire to serve in the generations that followed.

How many of you come from families were multiple generations have served?

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